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WLCF December News

12 Dec 2014 14:10:11

WLCF December News

WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo's resident cassowary, Princess, is acting as a key ambassador to raise funds for three orphaned cassowary chicks in Far-North Queensland. Support of the program to rear the chicks and rehabilitate them into the wild is run through WILD LIFE Conservation Fund's ties to Rainforest Rescue, the creator of the 'Save the Cassowary Fund.'

At the moment WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo is offering Cassowary Encounters exclusively for the purpose of collecting donations. These encounters allow guests to get up close and feed Princess for only a small donation to the WILD LIFE Conservation Fund, with all proceeds going directly to Rainforest Rescue's program. The collection of these donations is proving to be a great success in funding the rearing of these chicks!

The first two chicks were brought into care in Rainforest Rescue's Centre in Queensland after their father was attacked by a pet dog. The third chick was found after being struck by a vehicle and brought to a specialist veterinary service in the area.

Cassowary chicks are usually reared by their dad in the wild, who provides them protection and a vital education on what fruit and plants are edible. By providing the right care, it is expected that all three orphaned chicks will make a full recovery and be returned to the wild, despite the absence of dad. However, the process is costly.

One cassowary chick costs $36 a day to feed. The chicks require care for a least the next 12 months. As there are less than 1,500 Southern Cassowaries believed to be left in the wild, it is more important than ever to see these chicks successfully re-released. They are the future of this endangered species.

We'll keep you up to date on how WILD LIFE Conservation Fund's contributions are aiding these little chicks to grow up.

(Photos © Rainforest Rescue)